<div dir="ltr">Hi<br><div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Nov 15, 2013 at 10:26 AM, Winfried Tilanus <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:winfried@tilanus.com" target="_blank">winfried@tilanus.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">On 14-11-13 18:47, Ralf Skyper Kaiser wrote:<br>
<br>
Hi,<br>
<div class="im"><br>
> d. How is the jabber server admin in control when everyone has to trust<br>
> the master root key and all subsequent keys up to the sub domain of the<br>
> jabber server? That's not in the control of the jabber admin.<br>
<br>
</div>Please take some time to study DNSSEC before making statements like this.<br>
<br></blockquote></div><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">This thinking that there is only ONE MASTER ROOT KEY that has to be trusted is a fantasy.<br><br>1. Most likely will there be a set of MASTER ROOT KEYS<br>2. And even if it would be true [it is not] then what percentage of the Internet users would put their trust in a key that is ultimately geopolitically aligned with the US? And why should we not care about the other users?)<br>
<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">The RFC is also very clear on this and mentions this:<br><br>"This prevents an
   untrustworthy signer from compromising anyone's keys except those in
   their own subdomains."</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Let me give this another try with an example that shows that ANYONE in the domain-chain can compromise the trust.<br><br></div>
<div class="gmail_extra">For simplicity we use <a href="http://jabber.ir">jabber.ir</a> but it works equally well on other/longer domain names).<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Public Keys:<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">
"." - Public Key shipped with the resolver. This is the MASTER ROOT KEY<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">.IR - generated their own private/public key pair. Public key is signed by ROOT.<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">
JABBER.ir - generated their own private/public key pair. Public key is signed by .IR<br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br>".IR" is the attacker. ".IR" has access to the private key (they generated it).<br>
<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">User requests via DNSSEC the certificate for <a href="http://jabber.ir">jabber.ir</a>.<br><br>The attacker intercepts DNSSEC traffic and answers with a new public key (signed by ".IR" private key) and sends this new public key to the user. User authenticates and verifies that <a href="http://jabber.ir">jabber.ir</a>'s public key is signed by .IR. (and .IR's key is signed by ".").<br>
<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Pinning solves this. DANE does not.<br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">regards,<br><br>ralf<br><br></div><br></div></div>