<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Jan 16, 2014 at 5:36 PM, Winfried Tilanus <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:winfried@tilanus.com" target="_blank">winfried@tilanus.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">On 16-01-14 16:29, Kurt Zeilenga wrote:<br>
<br>
Hi,<br>
<div class="im"><br>
> and one note more specifically about patents...<br>
><br>
> good luck getting any large firm to assign needed patents to the XSF.<br>
<br>
</div>I hoped to make clear that this practice is a dead end indeed, by<br>
pointing out that only patent attorneys would get rich from implicitly<br>
assigning patents to the XSF.<br>
<br>
But still we have to decide if we want a royalty free general license or<br>
use patent licensing to protect the interests of the XSF (and make life<br>
of others more difficult.)<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>There's essentially four cases:</div><div><br></div><div>1) No patents impact a XEP.</div><div><br></div><div>We can cope with this one fine, of course.</div>
<div><br></div><div>2) A contributor/participant owns (or represents the owner of) a patent.</div><div><br></div><div>Here, we could require disclosure or licensing.</div><div><br></div><div>3) A contributor/participant is aware of a third party patent.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Here, we can only require disclosure.</div><div><br></div><div>4) A third-party patent exists which is unknown to any participant.</div><div><br></div><div>In this instance, we're stuffed whichever way.</div>
<div><br></div><div>The IETF goes for disclosure; the intent is that other participants can take a view on it during the standards process if possible.</div></div></div></div>