<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2800.1126" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>I have been doing some research on VoIP and as far 
as I can see, it all seems to come down to H.323 vs SIP.  H.323 I believe 
has entered version 4 if I am correct and I am not exactly familiar with the 
differences between each version but as far as I can see SIP seems to fit with 
Jabber more that H.323.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Here is a brief Comparison I have made followed by 
a link to a pdf that I found very useful in identifying the differences between 
the two.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>H.323<BR> Pros:<BR> Very Generalized And 
Fexible<BR> Allows for Voice, Video and many other possible 
facets<BR> Specifies Multipoint Control Unit protocols for Bridging or 
Conferencing<BR> Specifies interfacing with many other carrier methods 
outside of TCP/IP<BR> Large Industry Support</FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2> Cons:<BR> Bloated - Desires to Address 
Everything, including little obscure protocols that may have no Relevance to 
Jabber<BR> Noisy - Can cause lots of uncessesary traffic on a 
network<BR> Large System Footprint - Because of its extreme generalization, 
it requires rather large libraries to implement it properly.<BR> Overly 
Complex<BR> Requires gatekeepers to manage calls<BR> Difficult to 
troubleshoot due to its complexity</FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>
<DIV><BR>SIP</DIV>
<DIV> Pros:<BR> Very Specific in that it was designed to directly 
address Voice over IP<BR> Maximizes available bandwidth by keeping its 
messages lean and to the point<BR> Smaller System Footprint - More focused 
allowing for less code required in its libraries<BR> Light Weight - can 
process more call ser second than H.323<BR> extensible</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV> Cons:<BR> Limited by its very nature to only voice 
communications<BR> </FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2><A 
href="http://www.sipcenter.com/files/Wind_River_SIP_H323.pdf">http://www.sipcenter.com/files/Wind_River_SIP_H323.pdf</A></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>I am still researching but so far it looks to me 
that if Jabber were to adopt a single standard for clients to use for VoIP 
integration that SIP should probably be it.  And with the development of 
XMPP over SIP, this makes the choice even more logical.  </FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Again, I am not proposing that we should integrate 
SIP and VoIP into the Jabber server, but if the Jabber Software Foundation were 
to adopt a single VoIP protocol as its recommended standard for implementing 
voice, that VoIP actually begin to creep its way into more clients than just 
Enigma 3.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>I am still looking for some suitable open source 
implementations of SIP servers to recommend to Jabber server administators that 
want to offer SIP and I do thing there may need to be some way for the Jabber 
server to inform that client where the SIP server is.  This may just need 
to be a transport or component of some sort.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Vapor</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>