<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 12 October 2015 at 20:32, Evgeny Khramtsov <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:xramtsov@gmail.com" target="_blank">xramtsov@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Mon, 12 Oct 2015 16:27:51 -0300<br>
<span class="">Ben Langfeld <<a href="mailto:ben@langfeld.me">ben@langfeld.me</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
> So your argument is in-fact that there's nothing wrong with Privacy<br>
> Lists and therefore the XSF should continue promoting it as a good<br>
> quality specification?<br>
<br>
</span>No, probably it should be improved. The problem with Privacy Lists is<br>
that developers are trying to implement it as is and end up with<br>
iptables-like interface.<br>
</blockquote></div><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">That's exactly it.</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">One client, used exclusively, can construct useful and valid rules to express particular semantics (like invisibility, for example).</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Two different clients can't recognise each other's rules and present any kind of useful UX.</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">What's needed is a set of protocol which express, semantically, what the user is trying to accomplish, such that different clients can universally understand the semantics of the user's desires, and represent accordingly.</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Dave.</div></div>