[Operators] spam resistance

Olle E. Johansson oej at edvina.net
Fri May 24 09:02:26 UTC 2013


24 maj 2013 kl. 11:00 skrev Dave Cridland <dave at cridland.net>:

> On Fri, May 24, 2013 at 12:25 AM, Peter Saint-Andre <stpeter at stpeter.im> wrote:
> On 5/23/13 4:50 PM, Justin Uberti wrote:
> > I just realized my statement could be parsed 2 different ways. To
> > be clear: it is sad that spammers were more willing to adopt
> > XMPP*than other IM networks were willing to*. Believe me, we
> > tried.
> 
> I completely agree!
> 
> 
> Ah, that makes a lot more sense, yes.
> 
> Though I'd still point out that in terms of federating XMPP enterprises, and so on, there's a lot of domains which *could* federate.
> 
> Some 15,000 Lync domains potentially, for instance.
> 
> Don't you feel embarrassed that Microsoft is now better at open standards than Google in this area? :-)
>  
> It's interesting that open federation is taken for granted in email
> (perhaps because people think it's always been that way, even though
> it wasn't always that way), whereas it's a tough sell for anything
> else (IM, voice, video, social networking, etc.). I still don't quite
> understand why...
> 
> 
> I think email was different for three reasons:
> 
> 1) Email came about mostly before the Internet took off - indeed, there's an argument that the Internet expansion was driven by email, not the other way around. This placed restrictions on how email could grow.
> 
> 2) SMTP was chosen as the lowest common denominator; it's a gatewaying protocol at heart (as made obvious when you look at early design MTAs like sendmail). XMPP, however, has end-to-end properties, so it's harder to use for gatewaying to non-XMPP networks together. (Though people seem to manage fine)
> 
> 3) The way advertising now operates (and it may very well change) relies on having as much personal and behavioural information on the subjects as possible - there's no incentive for networks to federate if they're consumer-grade and large enough, it's better for their advertising to be a walled garden.

Twitter seems to have a lot of experience here. ON the Stockholm Internet Forum the other day someone from Twitter talked about their spam filters. Maybe they can join the discussion.

/O
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