[Foundation] (no subject)

Gregory Leblanc gleblanc at linuxweasel.com
Wed Aug 21 12:30:12 CDT 2002


On Wed, 2002-08-21 at 03:05, Dirk-Willem van Gulik wrote:
> 
> Another item to consider is 'what' to publish.
> 
> I personally usually advocate to:
> 
> ->	Just publish the X people which have the largest number of
> 	votes and are thus in the board; but refrain from showing
> 	numbers as to avoid people feeling penalized or left out
> 	or inhibit them from running again due to humilation feelings.
> 
> ->	Not publish who voted for what. I.e. have a closed ballot. This
> 	is actually a legal requirement in some countries when a vote
> 	is about people.

I'm not a big fan of secret ballots.  Perhaps in a few instances, they
can keep people from getting bruised feelings, but that's about the only
benefit they have.  Jabber is about openness, and closed ballots are
quite against that principle.  Interim results do seem like a bad thing,
though.  Hopefully all ballots can be made public after the election
results are counted and final.

> At the same time I also feel it is important to keep things fair - and
> hence usually try to make sure that:

Well, we're using a 1-vote, 1-candidate system, which seems terribly
unfair in and of itself.  Preferential voting seems a much better way to
go.  I was planning to write something up about this over the next few
weeks, but since it's been brought up now, I'll at least give out the
few URLs that I have.

Two papers on preferential voting in .au
http://www.aec.gov.au/_content/What/voting/count_senate.htm
http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/vote.html

Python script that demonstrates the counting scheme. 
http://www.daa.com.au/~james/files/preferential.py

It's really well worth looking at, and I do believe it can only lead to
fairer elections.
	Greg





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