<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Jan 23, 2014 at 11:00 PM, Matthew A. Miller <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:linuxwolf@outer-planes.net" target="_blank">linuxwolf@outer-planes.net</a>></span> wrote:<br>


<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">I'd also be happy to work on this.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>This, I warn you, is going to be a rant.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Back on the 7th of January, Peter suggested that it would be great if he could hand over the day-to-day functions of the XEP Editor - which are boring, time-consuming, and generally thankless tasks - to a small team of members who could take up the work. I would like to say the vast majority of the members were in favour, but actually only 10 or so spoke up. Many of these were members who already contribute a considerable amount of time to the XSF - let's call these the usual suspects.</div>
<div><br></div><div>There's a number of these people - you'll find them on the Board and on the Council, of course, but there's also those members who work (very) hard on the infrastructure, website, and other things - though often (but not always) these people are *also* Board or Council. Ex-Board and Council members are often reliable to call on, too. There are even one or two people who irritate by asking for trivial changes to websites constantly, but I'd frankly rather that than the deafening silence this thread has generated.</div>
<div><br></div><div>This - the XEP Editor function - is at the very core of what we - the XSF - do. It is of vital importance. I was rather hoping we'd have more than two volunteers; it's been quite a few days now. I'm beginning to wonder what on earth many of the members applied to join the XSF for.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Want to submit XEPs? Great - but you don't need to be a member to do that.</div><div><br></div><div>Want to suggest changes to them, or write whole new sections? Awesome - but you don't need to be a member to do that.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Want to proselytize about XMPP? Fantastic - but you don't need to be a member to do that.</div><div><br></div><div>Want to turn up to a nice Dinner? Well, okay - but you could always be a sponsor instead of a member, and you'd be doing the XSF a lot more good that way.</div>
<div><br></div><div>None of these are reasons to be a member of the XSF. But there are good reasons.</div><div><br></div><div>Want to act as technical guardian of the XEPs? Ah, *then* you'll be wanting to join. Want to help edit them? That's great, join us and volunteer. Want to help decide how we distribute and license the specs? Come, join us, we need all the help we can get.</div>
<div><br></div><div>The only thing the XSF *requires* from its members is that you take part in votes. But that's different from what I'd like to see. It's not that I don't want strong XEP contributors to be members, too - we need those for liaison teams, if nothing else - but most of all I want smart people to join us who are willing to help run a standards development organization. I want those people to apply, I want those people to be the ones we decide to vote in (and don't get me started on the people who seem to vote yes to everything).</div>
<div><br></div><div>I appreciate that many members who read this far will probably be amongst the usual suspects, for which I apologise - this isn't aimed at the hard working members who make up a significant minority. If you think, though, that you could do more for the XSF as a member, please do volunteer for things like this - or just turn up to Board and Council meetings, or hang about in the <a href="mailto:xsf@muc.xmpp.org">xsf@muc.xmpp.org</a> chatroom; there's a million and one little tasks that need doing all the time.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Be one of the usual suspects; I'm sure you'd be made welcome.</div><div><br></div><div>Be useful.</div><div><br></div><div>Dave.</div><div><br></div></div></div></div>