[Standards-JIG] jep-0142 and a city council workgroup

Chris Fanning christopher.fanning at gmail.com
Fri Mar 18 08:23:40 UTC 2005


Hi Steve,

Nice to meet you.

> 
> First of all it could be a good starting point to contact folks at
> [1]jabberes.org. You do have a quite healthy community there already
> using jabber (on the web).
> 
Yes, I've seen that. Thankyou.

> Second, if I got you right, you're looking for a web based, open-source
> solution. 

Up till now, with Matt, it seems that there are three different areas of effort.

1. User client (web)
>> This is perhaps better only as simple interface as not to confuse the public.

> I think that the vast majority of the implementations will go this route
> In fact, you don't even need a full XMPP client for the web side.
> It doesn't need to be able to handle rosters, etc -- it just has to have
> the ability to make a request to a workgroup queue, wait to be routed,
> and then join a group chat.

What do you think Steve?

2. Service
> The server component is one of the more complex pieces. It has to
> understand how to route to agents based on availability, skills, etc.

Maybe I'm missing something. If the agent (person) can see all the
requests waiting in the queue, then he/she can click on 'accept queued
request', then route to a group chat room. So that would mean that the
server doesn't necesarily need to route based on availability, skills,
etc. but would be more of a 'broadcast' sort of thing.

What do you make of that Matt? 

3. Agent client
>> Mutliplatform for future gnu/desktop migration.

> Right, in most cases you'd definitely want agents to use a full desktop
> client. A simple version would be customizing an existing client (as you
> suggest) to support accepting incoming offers and then routing to a
> group chat room. More complex agent clients would implement all the
> extra stuff such as the ability to view what other agents are doing, etc.

It seems that there are two different clients here.
1. Agent client: to support accepting incoming offers and then routing
to a group chat room
2. Admin client:  would implement all the extra stuff such as the
ability to view what other agents are doing, etc

In the real world, all councils, companies,...  will have different
Admin requirements.
Perhaps one way to do this is with one base client (the Agent client),
with some sort of Admin-module plugin.
We've been using psi here at work for nearly 2 years.
What client would be suitible to work with?

==========

> Then you might be interested in [2]JSJaC an open-source
> library for implementing web based jabber solution. [3]JWChat, which has
> already been mentioned here, is built on top of this library being one
> of the most advanced, yet web based jabber clients available.
>
How do you feel your work can adapt Steve?
 
> So either you decide to build a new project on top of JSJaC or building
> a customized version of JWChat, as the author of both projects I'd be
> glad to help you out with that.

ok. Good :)

> There's no reason to stick with commercial solutions as a lot of work
> has already been done in the open-source community.
> 
I agree. Especially when you talk about networking software.

Cheers
Chris.



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