[Standards] XEP-0301 Session handling

Peter Saint-Andre stpeter at stpeter.im
Wed Feb 29 18:40:20 UTC 2012


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On 2/28/12 11:28 PM, Gunnar Hellström wrote:
> Returning to the initial question of this thread: Is there a common
> way to indicate session start and session end.
> 
> Peter Saint-Andre skrev 2012-02-29 04:20:
>> Yes, but that doesn't necessarily mean you need an explicit
>> negotiation protocol.
> Right. The first need I thought about can in fact be reduced to a
> text session indicator, not even linked to RTT support.
> 
> I will take a scenario to make the need clear.
> 
> Assume that there is a SIP based stock exchange service, sending
> stock exchange information in text in sessions. It continues as
> long as a terminal is connected. A terminal indicates by a BYE that
> it leaves the session, so that the server can release the
> resources. During the session, the text information may be provided
> through RFC 4103 or RFC 3428 or RFC 4975. (RFC 4103 makes most
> sense of course for the RTT example, but let us look at it in
> general).
> 
> Also assume that you want to make this service available to XMPP
> users through a gateway. Setting up a chat session to the gateway
> causes it to set up a SIP session with the stock exchange server. 
> Messages or real-time text is flowing from the stock exchange
> server to the XMPP client. Then, the XMPP user want to leave the
> session. What does the user do and what does the gateway use as an
> indication that the session is over and it can take down the
> session towards the server?

I really think that if you want to gateway between SIP and XMPP, you
want to use Jingle. Such gatewaying was one of the core considerations
for Jingle. Now, I haven't looked at RFC 4103 in quite a while, but we
can certainly write a spec that defines how to translate between
XEP-0301 and RFC 4103 (e.g., how to translate the SDP). Personally I
don't think we absolutely need a way to complete a formal negotiation
over XMPP itself, because I tend to think that just sending a chat
message is a much more natural interaction, but *if* we think we need
such a negotiation method, we should just use Jingle.

Peter

- -- 
Peter Saint-Andre
https://stpeter.im/


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