For me it does! If someone sends a message to <a href="mailto:tma...@gmail.com">tma...@gmail.com</a> i get the mail but <a href="mailto:tma...@googlemail.com">tma...@googlemail.com</a> was the account that I've registered.
<br><br>Tobias Markmann<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 2/1/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Sean Egan</b> <<a href="mailto:seanegan@gmail.com">seanegan@gmail.com</a>> wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
On 2/1/07, Chris Mullins <<a href="mailto:chris.mullins@coversant.net">chris.mullins@coversant.net</a>> wrote:<br>> I know Google Talk is currently doing some form of aliasing between <a href="http://gmail.com">gmail.com
</a> & <a href="http://googletalk.com">googletalk.com</a>, but I've not looked into the details on how it works. Any other servers offering this today? (XCP? OPN?)<br><br>It's not aliasing. <a href="http://gmail.com">
gmail.com</a> and <a href="http://googlemail.com">googlemail.com</a> are two separate<br>domains with entirely unique users on each. It'll do some tricks to<br>let you login as either and bind you to your proper domain, but
<br>sending a message to someone at @<a href="http://gmail.com">gmail.com</a> won't go to that person<br>@<a href="http://googlemail.com">googlemail.com</a>.<br><br>-s.<br></blockquote></div><br>