<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    Hi Mark,<br>
    <br>
    I want to add on history of textphone and XMPP to old telephones
    that uses older protocols:<br>
    <br>
    <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Protocols">Protocols</span></h2>
    <p>There are many different textphone standards.</p>
    <h3> <span class="mw-headline" id="Baudot_code">Baudot code</span></h3>
    <p>The original standard used by TTYs is the <a
        href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baudot_code" title="Baudot
        code">Baudot code</a> implemented asynchronously at either 45.5
      or 50 baud, 1 start bit, 5 data bits, and 1.5 stop bits. Baudot is
      a common protocol in the US.</p>
    <h3> <span class="mw-headline" id="Turbo_Code">Turbo Code</span></h3>
    <p>In addition to regular Baudot, the <a
href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=UltraTec&action=edit&redlink=1"
        class="new" title="UltraTec (page does not exist)">UltraTec</a>
      company implements another protocol known as Enhanced TTY, which
      it calls "Turbo Code," in its products. Turbo Code has some
      advantages over Baudot protocols, such as a higher data rate, full
      <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII" title="ASCII">ASCII</a>
      compliance, and full-duplex capability. However, Turbo Code is
      proprietary, and UltraTec only gives its specifications to parties
      who are willing to license it.</p>
    <h3> <span class="mw-headline" id="Other_legacy_protocols">Other
        legacy protocols</span></h3>
    <p>Other protocols used for text telephony are European Deaf
      Telephone (EDT) and <a
        href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dual-tone_multi-frequency_signaling"
        title="Dual-tone multi-frequency signaling">Dual-tone
        multi-frequency signaling</a> (DTMF).</p>
    <p>The ITU V series recommendations are a collection of early modem
      standards approved by the <a
        href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ITU" title="ITU"
        class="mw-redirect">ITU</a> in 1988.</p>
    <ul>
      <li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ITU_V.21" title="ITU
          V.21" class="mw-redirect">ITU V.21</a> <a rel="nofollow"
          class="external autonumber"
href="http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-V.21/recommendation.asp?lang=en&parent=T-REC-V.21-198811-I">[1]</a>
        specifies 300 bits per second duplex mode.</li>
      <li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ITU_V.23" title="ITU
          V.23">ITU V.23</a> <a rel="nofollow" class="external
          autonumber"
href="http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-V/recommendation.asp?lang=en&parent=T-REC-V.23">[2]</a>
        specifies <a
          href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_frequency-shift_keying"
          title="Audio frequency-shift keying" class="mw-redirect">audio
          frequency-shift keying</a> modulation to encode and transfer
        data at 600/1200 bits per second.</li>
    </ul>
    <h3> <span class="mw-headline" id="V.18">V.18</span></h3>
    <p>In 1994 the <a
href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Telecommunication_Union"
        title="International Telecommunication Union">ITU</a> approved
      the <a
href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=ITU_V.18&action=edit&redlink=1"
        class="new" title="ITU V.18 (page does not exist)">V.18</a>
      standard <a rel="nofollow" class="external autonumber"
        href="http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-V.18/en">[3]</a>. V.18 is a
      dual standard. It is both an umbrella protocol that allows
      recognition and interoperability of some of the most commonly used
      textphone protocols, as well as offering a native V.18 mode, which
      is an <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII" title="ASCII">ASCII</a>
      full- or half-duplex modulation method.</p>
    <p>Computers can, with appropriate software and modem, emulate a
      V.18 TTY. Some voice modems, coupled with appropriate software,
      can now be converted to TTY modems by using a software-based
      decoder for TTY tones. Same can be done with such software using a
      computer's sound card, when coupled to the telephone line.</p>
    <p>In the UK, a virtual V.18 network, called TextDirect, exists as
      part of the <a
        href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_Switched_Telephone_Network"
        title="Public Switched Telephone Network" class="mw-redirect">Public
        Switched Telephone Network</a>, thereby offering
      interoperability between textphones using different protocols. The
      platform also offers additional functionality like call progress
      and status information in text and automatic invocation of a relay
      service for speech-to-text calls.</p>
    <br>
    <blockquote cite="mid:4FFA59ED.8090201@stpeter.im" type="cite">
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>