<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On 25 June 2015 at 09:27, Kevin Smith <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:kevin.smith@isode.com" target="_blank">kevin.smith@isode.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Thinking a bit about the MUC2 stuff. MUC1 had Anon/semianon/nonanon. We’ve pretty much killed off fully anonymous rooms in MUC1.<br>
<br>
Can people share their thoughts on usecases for semi-anon, please? It’s not entirely clear to me what these are (users who want anonymity seem to already be using throw-away JIDs to achieve that, instead of relying on MUC configuration).<br>
<br>
There seems to be some significant merit in having MUCs always be non-anonymous in MUC2, to solve some of the addressing messes we’ve found ourselves in.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Some thoughts:</div><div><br></div><div>I think almost every MUC room I'm in is semi-anonymous.</div><div><br></div><div>The only exception I could immediately find was the Openfire chatroom, <a href="mailto:open_chat@conference.igniterealtime.org">open_chat@conference.igniterealtime.org</a> - it seems pretty unlikely that this is by accident, but perhaps every server does this by default, and none of the admins have ever noticed. Removing a widely deployed feature doesn't strike me as a viable option.</div><div><br></div><div>I (personally, mind you) would be happy if pseudonymized users in chatrooms reduced available features. For example, it seems bizarre that in the typical [semi-]anonymous MUC, I can query a vCard of an "anonymous" user. So for example I can join the XSF chatroom, and while I cannot discover Zash's jid, I can find his real name and email address. This strikes me as nuts.<br></div><div><br></div><div>I also suspect that if we promoted the usage of anonymizers as a day-to-day way to shield one's jid, this might have detrimental effects on chatroom abuse.</div><div><br></div><div>Dave.</div></div></div></div>