<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 12 October 2015 at 09:22, Evgeny Khramtsov <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:xramtsov@gmail.com" target="_blank">xramtsov@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Mon, 12 Oct 2015 08:45:29 -0300<br>
<span class="">Ben Langfeld <<a href="mailto:ben@langfeld.me">ben@langfeld.me</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
> If no-one is prepared to say why they won't do this but continues to<br>
> complain about the absence of XEPs then the assumption has to be that<br>
> they are trolling.<br>
<br>
</span>So, if I complain there is no feature X in software Y and I'm unwilling<br>
to implement it, I'm trolling. Good point.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>What else would you call it?</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
> Could you share them?<br>
<br>
I would say writing XEPs requires tons of effort: translating it into<br>
English (for non-native speakers), arguing on the list, maintaining it,<br>
etc.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Someone has to do this. Who exactly do those developers who complain about specs they want not existing believe is responsible for doing this for them at no cost, and why?</div><div><br></div><div>XMPP is not perfect. Nothing is. It exists as a result of the good will of those who contribute to it. We should remember that and be grateful for it, not expect infinitely more.</div></div></div></div>