<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On 12 October 2015 at 12:25, Evgeny Khramtsov <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:xramtsov@gmail.com" target="_blank">xramtsov@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Mon, 12 Oct 2015 09:48:07 -0300<br>
<span class="">Ben Langfeld <<a href="mailto:ben@langfeld.me">ben@langfeld.me</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
> I'm afraid they'd be mistaken in this belief.<br>
<br>
</span>Developers are bad, mmmkay. </blockquote><div><br></div><div>Not mad, but lazy. This is one of the defining and some might argue required traits of a software developer - it's what leads us to seek one-time solutions for otherwise repetitious tasks. Unfortunately it boils over into "that's someone else's job" sometimes, even when that "someone" can't be identified.</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">So what do you suggest? Teaching them to be<br>
better? I bet that's not the goal of XSF. I think the solution is to<br>
accept the fact developers do not want writing specs in general and act<br>
accordingly. As an example: do not deprecate XEPs when there is no<br>
replacement.<br>
</blockquote></div><br></div></div>